Me, operating our DIT cart on the set of a recent job we did at Light Sail VR

Those of us who have been on professional film productions anytime in the last two decades or so know the utter importance of having a qualified and talented DIT on set. DIT stands for “Digital Imaging Technician” and involves skills far more than simply copying and verifying media from digital cameras to hard drives. A really good DIT is able to work closely with the cinematographer and director to help inform creative decisions and help communicate to important stakeholders.

My expectations for a DIT have always been high. Having a strong post production background and invented many of the workflows…


Our office is still there… just empty.

Since the pandemic began, the team at Light Sail VR has been working from our homes. For the most part, it hasn’t been too challenging. We check in via Google Hangouts every morning and at the end of the day. We hop into VR around lunch time to touch base and play a short game. We upgraded our home computers and heavily utilized Google Drive to synchronize project files and media. We managed to deliver several high profile projects this way for our clients. This all seemed to be working well, until it wasn’t.

The problem of working this way…


We’ve landed on another world…

This is Part 2 of a two part series that chronicles how I built a workflow with this camera to capture and produce extremely high quality monoscopic 360 video. Here we’ll talk about the post production workflow I’ve been battle testing over the past few weeks, while part 1 talks in depth about the production and how the camera is to use on set. If you are considering purchasing or renting this system to use on a project, I strongly recommend reading both and understanding exactly what this camera is and is not capable of before diving in.

To follow…


This is Part 1 of a two part series that chronicles how I built a workflow with this camera to capture and produce extremely high quality monoscopic 360 video. Here we’ll talk about the camera itself, while part 2 talks in depth about the post production pipeline. If you are considering purchasing or renting this system to use on a project, I strongly recommend reading both and understanding exactly what this camera is and is not capable of before diving in.

Will 12K be enough for immersive capture with this lens?

I’ve been working in immersive media for the past five years having directed and produced over a hundred individual…


Last December, Light Sail VR shot a music video for the incredibly talented Jacob Collier and the first single of his new album Djesse Vol. 2. It was an incredibly rewarding experience and we’re very proud of the finished product. Jacob’s creativity and collaboration is so vibrant throughout the piece and he hid so many fun references for his fans to explore.

While initially this was supposed to only be released as a 360 video, there were concerns about how sometimes people watching 360 videos tend to feel like there is too much to take in and how the story…


There has been a lot of talk about VR180 in the last few months and we’ve began dipping our toes into this exciting new medium at Light Sail VR with our show ‘Now Your Turn’. Each semester, our company takes on several interns to give students the opportunity to use our tools, learn our techniques, and help us shape this growing medium. This semester, one of the projects was to explore techniques regarding POV camera movement and creative choices when filming in VR180. …


We’ve recently launched a new show called “Now Your Turn” on Geek & Sundry that was filmed using Google’s new VR180 format.

When VR180 was announced, it was met with a fair amount of skepticism from the 360 video community. This article won’t debate the merits of VR180 except to say that I don’t think the existence of VR180 takes anything away from 360 video. For reasons I will get into, I believe they are different mediums with different creative uses and audiences. So let’s move on.

This was the first time Light Sail VR had worked with the VR180…


Last week, in Part 2, I detailed some of the amazing work that went into the production of Speak of the Devil. Production is funny because the final shot feels like you’ve reached the end of something, but in reality, it’s just a chapter and there is still so much more work to do. Post production is where everything starts to come together.

If you are just catching up with us, I highly recommend checking out the first two parts about the planning and filming of Speak of the Devil.


Last week in Part 1, I dove into some of our process in designing what we are calling a “mesh narrative”. Pre-production is the foundation of every successful VR project, but sometimes when you have never done anything like this before, it’s a bit of a scramble in trying to figure out exactly what you need to create.

Production is my favorite part of creating 360 live action VR. …


I knew creating this project would be hard. I don’t think, however, I realized how many techniques I’d have to invent and learn in the process. I hope the following series of articles sheds some light into our process and vision for creating interactive live action narratives in VR.

If you aren’t familiar with Speak of the Devil, watch our trailer below.

2D Trailer for Speak of the Devil, you can find the 360 version here.

PART 1: DESIGNING A “MESH NARRATIVE”

When I was 10 year old, I played MYST for the first time. It was a transformative experience (much in the same way that…

Matthew Celia

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